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Author Topic: New users: Introduce yourself  (Read 2288 times)
Paul
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« on: March 07, 2009, 03:47:10 AM »

Greetings, and welcome to retro-link.com.  I'll start with myself.  My name is Paul Quirk, and I founded retro-link.com on the basis of my favourite hobby; that being, retro computing.  My first computer was a Vic 20, and presently I own a Vic 20, Commodore 64, 128, Macintosh Plus, Amiga 500, Amiga 2000, Tandy TRS-80 Model 100, Amiga CD-32, Commodore 16, Atari 2600, Atari Flashback, Super Nintendo, and an IBM PS/1.  Whew.  I decided there had to be a place where people of all different retro computing interests could get together, and that place would be retro-link.com.

Please tell us about yourself.
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"Life and death are of supreme importance. Time swiftly passes by and opportunity is lost. Each of us should strive to awaken. Awaken. Take heed, do not squander your life." - Dogen Zenji
Rorshach
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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2009, 06:16:51 AM »

I am another retro computer fan using such machines since they was new.  My main interests in retrocomputers is BBS & communications also both Commodore & Atari computers.  I have the following:

Amiga 500
Commodore 64 (x3 working a couple being fixed up)
Commodore 16 (x3 all upgraded to 64k)
Commodore Plus/4

Atari 2600 (4 switch) original owner since end of 1982
Atari 600XL (upgraded 64k & Ben Poehland video mod)
Atari 800 with SWR8000
Atari 130XE (also original owner)
Atari TT030 (CaTTamaran upgrade)
Atari 4160STe (x2)
Atari Mega ST4 (x2)
Atari 520ST (x3)
Atari Jaguar (original owner since end of 1995)
Atari 65XE (bought april 4, 2009)

Plus various peripherals and software for the above.  The above are not listed in any perticular order other than brand as I don't play favourites all that much and I don't put any brands of retro down other than not liking wintel architecture all that much.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2009, 04:39:00 AM by Rorshach » Logged
harbitk
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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2009, 05:07:45 PM »

Hi everyone,

I'm Ken Harbit, I'm interested in all old computer things. Everything from ENIAC modern day stuff, with emphasis on about 1995 and earlier.  Hardware, software, manuals, books, newsletters, magazines. I'm also interested in early Internet, AOL, Dephi, and all the other early providers.

I have a small collection of vintage computers that include:
Atari 800
Atari 1200
various Atari 800 peripherals
COSMAC ELF
Commodore 64
Commodore 64C
Commodore 128
Various Commodore peripherals
ZX81
TS2068
QL
various Timex-Sinclair peripherals
Manuals, books, magazines

In the late '70s and early '80s I was a government contractor working on ARPANET and a few others such as MILNET. In 1980 I started working on hardware changes to existing ARPA equipment to make it into Internet equipment.

I've been working with computers and networks since the 1960s...back when they had tubes.

I have two favorite Personal Computers Timex-Sinclair ZX81 and COSMAC ELF.

I'm not much of a tech any more, most of my knowledge comes from the 60s and 70s, I'm more of a historian now.
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Ken Harbit
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2009, 08:01:21 PM »

     Nice to see you here, Ken.  Smiley

                 Truly,
                 Robert Bernardo
                 Fresno Commodore User Group
                 http://videocam.net.au/fcug
                 Notacon 6 / Blockparty 3 on April 16-19
                 http://www.notacon.org , http://www.demoparty.us
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Rorshach
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« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2009, 08:41:38 PM »

Hey Ken,

I see we both have some favourites in common commodore & atari and also TS1000 in my case which is pretty close to the ZX81. Do tell more about the Cosmac Elf. Thats one fewer of us had heard of.
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harbitk
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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2009, 10:24:49 PM »

The ELF used an 1802 processor, the same one that the Voyager, Viking and Galileo space probes used. It was one of those "Popular Electronics" magazine build it yourself computers. I think it was August 1977, as I read about it I found I could scrounge up most of the parts from work (I was in the Navy at the time). The only thing I had to buy was the processor. I still have it, but it doesn't work. I need some time to open it up and check things out. There is a COSMAC webpage at http://www.cosmacelf.com. It's a real simple machine, the one I built has only 256 bytes of memory. 
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Ken Harbit
harbitk
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« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2009, 10:54:32 PM »

Hi Robert,

I met Robert 5 or 6 years ago at the Fresno Commodore user group. I'm still amazed at how much the C64 and 128 are still being used. I've seen references to an Ethernet interface, VGA converter box and even a stripped down version of Linux that can be used on the C64. Folks have figured out how to make it work with Internet. ... I just use mine for games. I still love the old games.

BTW, the Linux on C64 is one of the things that interest me about the Commodore line. I've used it exclusively on PCs for the past 3 years. It would be neat to be able to talk IBM PC to C64.

Ken Harbit
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Ken Harbit
Rorshach
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« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2009, 11:54:26 PM »

Hey there,

There is a couple linux like substances for 64. LUnix and ACE are 2 I have downloaded. There is also contiki which I've not used too much but it does have networking programs included. Aside from the still somewhat uncommon ethernet theres also good old RS232 adapters too. I so far have built 3 and 1 of those is now owned by DigitalQuirk and I have parts to make a fourth.
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RobertB
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2009, 06:36:29 AM »

I met Robert 5 or 6 years ago at the Fresno Commodore user group.
     Has it been that long already, Ken?  Well, we are still plugging away with our monthly meetings.  The next one will be a rare weeknight meeting (because all my April weekends are booked!).  Smiley

                      Truly,
                      Robert Bernardo
                      Fresno Commodore User Group
                      http://videocam.net.au/fcug
                      Notacon 6 / Blockparty 3 on April 16-19
                      http://www.notacon.org , http://www.demoparty.us
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nicholas124
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2009, 03:06:01 AM »

Hi im Nicholas124 and I have a commodore 64 system and I like the older computers because they are interesting Smiley
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RobertB
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« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2009, 08:25:57 AM »

     Hi, Nicholas.  Welcome to the forum!  Smiley

                      Truly,
                      Robert Bernardo
                      Fresno Commodore User Group
                      http://videocam.net.au/fcug
                      Notacon 6 / Blockparty 3 on April 16-19
                      http://www.notacon.org , http://www.demoparty.us
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Arkhan
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« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2009, 11:01:08 PM »

I'm arkhan...

Im 20, and a programmer.   I do most of my work on the 360, the PC Engine and the MSX.


I like the C64 for its SID chip mostly, and dislike it for its disk drives and their lack of reliability. Smiley
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northsongs
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« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2009, 05:56:54 PM »

Hello all,
Dave Ellingsworth here.

And yes, I'm guilty also of relishing the days when 64k was a lot of ram and having 2 disk drives that held 140k each was like heaven. Started out with an Apple II+ back when disco was still on the way. Loved that little machine and wasted oodles of time sitting at it, pecking away. I can remember spending hours entering, then debugging, code from mags like Nibble, and Hardcore Computist. That machine taught me more about programming than I learned in college!
Moved into Macs a few years later, but I still tinker with the old Apples now and then. Right now I have the original II+ that I had to start with, a Platinum //e, and a couple of the //c.
I'd mention the MS-DOS machines but they don't really count, do they?
When I was first getting paid for programming, way back when, I did some contract work on Commodore systems. Boy, you're right about unreliable disk drives!

Dave
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RobertB
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« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2009, 07:20:22 AM »

...I did some contract work on Commodore systems. Boy, you're right about unreliable disk drives!
     I wouldn't call them unreliable... just not very durable for long stretches.  Case in point, when reading/converting/writing disks with Big Blue Reader, our club treasurer found out that the 1541 or 1571 would give out after about 90 disks.  This was hour after hour of the disk drive continually working... no stopping at all other than to insert or remove the disk.
     However, if the drives are not put to such grueling work, they are perfectly fine, especially the cooler-running and/or speed-locked 1571s and 1541-IIs.

                      Truly,
                      Robert Bernardo
                      Fresno Commodore User Group
                      http://videocam.net.au/fcug
                      Notacon 6 / Blockparty 3 on April 16-19
                      http://www.notacon.org , http://www.demoparty.us
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SmallCleverDinosaur
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« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2009, 02:33:48 PM »

Hi,
Carl here, from Stockholm in Sweden.

I'm a true retro computer fan who began using them back in 1980 when my father bought a Commodore PET 3032. I've always been into programming and began by learning BASIC on the PET and later on ML on the C64 and C128. Today I work with program development professionally but occasionally also for fun on the C128 Smiley

I have the following:

Commodore 64 "Breadbin" x2
Commodore 64C
Commodore 128 x4
Commodore 128D plastic x3
Commodore 128DCR

Plus various peripherals and software for the above. I also like all the peripherals that have been developed for the C64 in recent years. Like MMC64 and MMC Replay (reading and writing SD-cards with the C64). I also have one of those neat video to VGA splitters so that I can use the Commodore with my 19" TFT-monitor. And even a CGA to VGA converter so I can use the 80-column RGBI output of the C128 with my VGA-monitor Smiley

The latest addition is the SD2IEC, a 1541 emulator that uses SD-cards for storage media and can be used with both the C64 and the C128.

I also collect books, mostly for the C128, but also for the C64 and like to convert the more rarer books to PDF's (scan-OCR-PDF). It slow work though so it takes time.

One reflection from the 80's. When I was a teenager, I had all the time in the world to work with my Commodores, but I had very little money. Now, that I have the money, I've got so little time...
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