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Retro Cars => General Discussions => Topic started by: RobertB on March 01, 2010, 08:41:27 AM



Title: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 01, 2010, 08:41:27 AM
     The 1972 Ford Ranchero has been bought!  It is sitting in my driveway right now.  Not a perfect car but a perfect car for a "restomod" - part restoration, part modernization.  New Sears battery and battery mounting hardware installed.  Next up, a gasket kit to seal the dripping 2-barrel carburetor on the 400 c.i. (6.6 L) V8 engine.  It's the project car, i.e., every month I'll spend some money to tweak it.
     Today two old-timers talked to me about the car, three young Sears mechanics eyed the engine of the car, and my brother-in-law gave it a visual once-over.  That car truck certainly calls attention to itself.

              Expect some photos sent over here (as soon as my
              sister gets them out of her digital still camera),
              Robert Bernardo
              Fresno Commodore User Group
              http://videocam.net.au/fcug
              The Other Group of Amigoids
              http://www.calweb.com/~rabel1/
              Southern California Commodore & Amiga Network
              http://www.sccaners.org


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: Paul on March 01, 2010, 06:17:14 PM
Sounds like a fun hobby!  One question; how are you going to find time to pursue your restoration/modding of your new toy and keep up with Commodore?  I have a hard time finding time for one hobby, let alone two!


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 02, 2010, 04:59:16 AM
...how are you going to find time to pursue your restoration/modding of your new toy and keep up with Commodore?
     I'm taking the advice of a friend who has a mid-60's Pontiac GTO... you don't have to go all out at restoring a car all at once; you can do a little at a time and spread it over the years.

                Truly,
                Robert Bernardo
                Fresno Commodore User Group
                http://videocam.net.au/fcug
                The Other Group of Amigoids
                http://www.calweb.com/~rabel1/
                Southern California Commodore & Amiga Network
                http://www.sccaners.org


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 04, 2010, 01:53:48 AM
Not a perfect car but a perfect car for a "restomod" - part restoration, part modernization.
(snip)
Expect some photos sent over here (as soon as my sister gets them out of her digital still camera)...
     Well, my sister is having trouble getting those pics out of her camera.  In the meantime, you can see the photos the former owner of the vehicle had put up on Flickr.  Go to

           http://www.flickr.com/photos/21960874@N06/sets/72157623310591004

                Truly,
                Robert Bernardo
                Fresno Commodore User Group
                http://videocam.net.au/fcug
                The Other Group of Amigoids
                http://www.calweb.com/~rabel1/
                Southern California Commodore & Amiga Network
                http://www.sccaners.org


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: Paul on March 04, 2010, 05:31:08 AM
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2726/4314513395_d4e973cb35.jpg)

Yup, I don't think I've ever seen a more masculine car.  Makes me want to drink a cold beer, grow a great mustache, and shoot some guns.   ;D


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 05, 2010, 11:26:10 PM
     Makes me want to drink a cold ice tea, trim the hair, and shoot a phaser.  ;)

                Yay!  A weekend to work in the yard and on the car,
                Robert Bernardo
                Fresno Commodore User Group
                http://videocam.net.au/fcug
                The Other Group of Amigoids
                http://www.calweb.com/~rabel1/
                Southern California Commodore & Amiga Network
                http://www.sccaners.org


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 09, 2010, 05:49:18 AM
     Mmm, I've been studying Mustangs & Fords magazine and Hot Rod magazine.  It looks as if I'll have to start saving up.  The Ranchero needs a nice Pertronix electronic distributor, a CHI aluminum intake manifold, and a FAST EZ-EFI throttle body.

            And those are just budget upgrades for a street machine,
            Robert Bernardo
            Fresno Commodore User Group
            http://videocam.net.au/fcug
            The Other Group of Amigoids
            http://www.calweb.com/~rabel1/
            Southern California Commodore & Amiga Network
            http://www.sccaners.org


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 18, 2010, 09:34:13 AM
     Took the Ranchero out for a spin around town today. Went zooming up and down the streets (all within speed limits). Not enough to chirp the tires but enough to put a smile on my face. :)

               Truly,
               Robert Bernardo
               Fresno Commodore User Group
               http://videocam.net.au/fcug
               The Other Group of Amigoids
               http://www.calweb.com/~rabel1/
               Southern California Commodore & Amiga Network
               http://www.sccaners.org


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on May 07, 2010, 07:02:20 AM
The Ranchero needs a nice Pertronix electronic distributor...
     Dearborn Classics - http://www.dearbornclassics.com - has a 50% off sale on any order over $199 this month.  I am most tempted to purchase the Pertronix billet distributor with the Ignitor II module (it would be even better if it had the Ignitor III module).  Now how do I work that into the budget?  :)

            Thinking,
            Robert Bernardo
            Fresno Commodore User Group
            http://videocam.net.au/fcug
            July 24-25 Commodore Vegas Expo 2010 - http://www.commodore.ca/forum
            and click on ComVEX


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: Rorshach on May 08, 2010, 12:09:13 AM
Looks good Robert.  Puts me in mind of a few classic cars I would want if I had the Ca$h & space for them.


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on June 11, 2010, 07:00:01 AM
     This is what the Ranchero looks like, in my possession.

                Truly,
                Robert Bernardo
                Fresno Commodore User Group
                http://videocam.net.au/fcug
                July 24-25 Commodore Vegas Expo 2010 - http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on June 12, 2010, 09:41:59 AM
     Oy!  The Ranchero is a bear to start when it hasn't been used in awhile.  I had to give the engine lots of warming up.  I'll be glad when I eventually get rid of its two-barrel carburetor and install fuel injection.
     In the meantime, to alleviate its start problems, I gave the carb and PCV valve a good cleaning with carburetor spray cleaner.  I got back an extra 150 RPM for that cleaning.  :)  Ah, the joy of carburetor spray cleaner... the fun of having the spray fly back in your face (glad I wore my glasses).  ;)

             Tomorrow I'll get a new crankcase vent filter on it,
             Robert Bernardo
             Fresno Commodore User Group
             http://videocam.net.au/fcug
             July 24-25 Commodore Vegas Expo 2010 - http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on June 18, 2010, 08:32:54 AM
Oy!  The Ranchero is a bear to start when it hasn't been used in awhile.  I had to give the engine lots of warming up.  I'll be glad when I eventually get rid of its two-barrel carburetor and install fuel injection.
     Another reason why the car needs plenty of warm-up time... the choke doesn't seem to be working... the carb throat is wide-open all the time.
     I went scooting around town the other day again in the Ranchero, this time a bit more aggressively.  I found out that I couldn't chirp the tires.  It goes like this -- heavy front end + light rear end + 300 ft. lbs of torque to the rear wheels = lots of wheel spinning!  :)  Either I need stickier tires, or I need to throw more weight into the bed of the truck.  And with that over-boosted, no-feel power steering, you're not quite sure if you're aimed correctly in a lane change.  Fun!  :D

              Looking through an Edelbrock catalog,
              Robert Bernardo
              Fresno Commodore User Group
              http://videocam.net.au/fcug
              July 24-25 Commodore Vegas Expo 2010 - http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on September 01, 2010, 08:56:49 PM
     The last few days I've been dropping a lot of money on the Ranchero to bring it up to my standards.  New starter solenoid, rebuilt starter, cooling system flush plus new radiator cap, new heater/a.c. blower motor, new heater core, and new power brake booster.  I've done some of the work, and the professional mechanics have done the rest of the work.  Whew!  I think I'd better stop my Ranchero spending for this month.  :)

          Another burst of spending in a few months,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://videocam.net.au/fcug


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on September 04, 2010, 08:12:42 AM
Whew!  I think I'd better stop my Ranchero spending for this month.
     Oh-oh, I have the fixing-up fever.  :)  I bought a rebuild kit, and if I get a free weekend, I'll rebuild that Ford two-barrel, type 2100 carburetor.

          That should stop its leaking ways,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://videocam.net.au/fcug


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on December 05, 2010, 12:14:04 PM
     Resto-modding the Ranchero has slowed to a snail's pace.  All my monies are going to replacing parts on the 1990 Ford Crown Vic as it nears the 350,000 mile mark.  If all goes well, I can begin dropping major money into the Ranchero again, starting in February.  In the meantime, I can do the little things, like crawling around to give it an oil change (Fram ToughGard filter) and changing the spark plugs (Autolite platinums).

          A-arm bushings needed on the Crown Vic,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://videocam.net.au/fcug
          The Other Group of Amigoids
          http://www.calweb.com/~rabel1/
          Southern California Commodore & Amiga Network
          http://www.sccaners.org


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on January 16, 2011, 09:06:00 AM
     After today's TOGA meeting, Amiga hardware tech, Duncan M., and I stood outside the pizza parlor in the bright sun and talked about lots of things, including my 72 Ranchero.  He wants to see it!  I told him it's not ready for a long-distance trip to San Jose.  It needs new power steering hoses, a chrome water pump, and new seatbelts.  I estimate that parts and labor would cost $600-700, money better spent to fund a trip to the mid-April Notacon in Cleveland or the June trip to Europe.
     However, work will progress on the Ranchero.  For February, I'll either get a new spare tire for it or new chrome lugnuts or both!  :)

          FCUG celebrating 30 years,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://videocam.net.au/fcug
          The Other Group of Amigoids
          http://www.calweb.com/~rabel1/
          Southern California Commodore & Amiga Network
          http://www.sccaners.org


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on June 14, 2011, 09:48:02 AM
     While I'm over here in Europe, I've been hauling around the Powerbook laptop.  Whenever anyone looks at the desktop picture I have of the Ranchero I have on the Powerbook, they are always impressed at what it is... and I have to explain about what it is.  For example, at the Saturday Lincolnshire Amiga Group meeting and at the Sunday Amiga North Thames meeting, I tell them it has a 6.6L V8 engine and takes premium gasoline, and they roll their eyes in amazement, saying that the engine is too big and that with gasoline prices being the way they are, the vehicle would be very expensive to maintain.  :)
     I also tell them it's a "20-footer", i.e., from 20 or more feet away, it looks great but get any nearer and then you start seeing its defects.  ;)

          Writing from Haywards Heath, England,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://videocam.net.au/fcug
          July 23-24 Commodore Vegas Expo v7 2011 - http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on January 08, 2012, 12:16:49 AM
     New Year's resolution... spend more time fixing up the Ranchero!

          Truly,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://videocam.net.au/fcug


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on February 05, 2013, 09:04:23 PM
     Last Saturday I went to visit FCUG member Alfredo M. at his house.  The primary reason was to videotape him by his SX-64 in honor of SX-64 day which was held on January 20 around the world.  After taping, he showed me the progress on the ground-up restoration of his 1967 Ford Mustang convertible.  Even though it still wasn't finished (upholstery, convertible top, rebuilt radiator, suspension parts, and miscellaneous parts still needed), it was very beautiful as it sat there with its $8,000+ bodywork and paint job.  I asked him all kinds of questions on the 289 V8 engine -- all rebuilt and repainted -- the suspension, the body trim, the instruments, and more.
     His work inspires me to do more to my Ford Ranchero.

          But he advises me not to do a ground-up resto... it's just too much work,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://videocam.net.au/fcug


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 29, 2014, 09:07:53 AM
New Year's resolution... spend more time fixing up the Ranchero!
     With major debt being retired by September (well, that's the plan), I will have more cash flow.  Yay!  That means the long-delayed work on the Ranchero can proceed.

          Finally,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://videocam.net.au/fcug


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on December 27, 2014, 12:25:56 PM
     It took awhile, but in November-December I spent the big money in Ford Ranchero repairs.  I installed the Autolite Double Platinum spark plugs and the valve cover gaskets (that last bolt next to the heater plenum took a long time to squeeze out).  Then I charged up the battery in order to bring it over to the Mooney Shell service station for a water pump replacement.
     However, when I connected the battery cables correctly, the secondary wiring leading away from the starter switch stated smoking and frying!  I immediately removed the battery cables, but it was too late... the wiring had been damaged.  So, the car was towed to the station.
     I wanted a heavy-duty water pump, and so, the original was replaced with a new Edelbrock aluminum h.d. pump (ooo, very shiny).  The lower radiator hose was also replaced.
     Troubleshooting the electrical system was a problem; that would take hours to track the problem(s).  After a thorough investigation, it was discovered that the battery had reversed polarity; that is why it fried my wiring, even though I had thought the cabling was connected correctly.  The Sears Diehard platinum battery was brought back to Sears, prorated, and replaced with a new one.  The wiring from the starter switch to the steering column was replaced with new 10-gauge wiring and fused (so that the wiring wouldn't burn up again should a repeat disaster happen).  The 70-amp alternator was replaced and the wiring harness to the alternator was rewired (the original owner had it wired wrongly and insulation was falling off of it).  New drive belts were installed, and they rebuilt the Ford two-barrel carburetor, installed a new fuel filter, and drained the gas tank (bad gas with water contaminated in the tank... I always wondered why the engine ran rough).
     Because the turn signals and right brake light didn't work, I asked them to fix that.  They discovered that the turn signal/brakelight multiswitch in the steering column had gone bad due to old age.  They replaced that, and they also discovered that the former owner had screwed around with one of the taillights.  Instead of a socket, he had directly soldered the lightbulb to the wiring.  There was no socket!  They put in a proper socket and put a bulb in that.
     They changed the oil and installed a new oil filter (which I could have done, but they got to it first).  Anyways, I'll have to run some engine crankcase cleaner (like SeaFoam) through the engine to get rid of more of the accumulated gunk.  The previous owner had let the old oil turn into black sludge.
     Well, I picked up the Ranchero, thinking that all was repaired, but I barely drove 2 blocks when the engine stalled out and wouldn't restart.  The car was towed back, and the next day the mechanics investigated.  The fuel filter was all plugged due to rust from the gas tank!  Yes, the old gas had been replaced with new gas, but now the new gas had been contaminated.  The gas tank was dropped and drained, and this time the inside of the tank was examined.  Rust!  It covered all the inside of tank and the fuel sending unit.  The tank was sent to Visalia Radiators in order to be boiled out and resealed.  I ordered a new sending unit plus gasket and grommets from Dearborn Classics and waited for those parts to arrive.  When they arrived, I brought them over to the service station which installed them into the rebuilt tank.  The tank was then bolted back into position.
     When I picked up the car for the second time, success!  The engine ran extremely smoothly, not its rough idle self which I had lived with for 5 years.  I filled the tank with premium gasoline (the manual called for 91 octane regular, but now 91 octane means premium) and promised myself not to let the gas level get so low that moisture would build up in the tank again.
     Still, the Ranchero is not ready for a long road trip.  I need at least 2 new tires - 225/70-14 BF Goodrich TA's - but more importantly, a recored or new radiator.  There is a leak in one of the lower tubes of the crossflow radiator.  The car came with a 3-row core radiator which is just adequate to my way of thinking.  My rule-of-thumb -- 1 row per 100 cubic inches of engine displacement.  The Ranchero has a 400 cubic inch V8; therefore, it would need a 4-row radiator.  I priced new radiators.  2-row radiators at $250, 3-row radiators at $300, and 4-row radiators at $500 to $700!  The Ranchero (and Torino) always had detonation/pinging problems.  Premium gas would solve some of the problem, and keeping the engine running cool would solve the rest of the problem.  I am tending toward the $700 radiator from US Radiator in Los Angeles.
     Estimated timeline for installation of the tires and radiator - mid-February.

          Truly,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on January 24, 2015, 05:37:12 AM
I need at least 2 new tires - 225/70-14 BF Goodrich TA's...
    O.K., I've ordered four, less expensive Cooper Cobra GT tires, and they should be here in a few days.
Quote
...but more importantly, a recored or new radiator.

(snip)

I am tending toward the $700 radiator from US Radiator in Los Angeles.  Estimated timeline for installation of the tires and radiator - mid-February.
    Well, the timeline has been pushed back!  The 1990 Ford Crown Vic, my daily driver, now needs a new heater core, and so, the money goes to that instead of the radiator for the Ranchero.

          Truly,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on January 29, 2015, 07:11:53 AM
O.K., I've ordered four, less expensive Cooper Cobra GT tires, and they should be here in a few days.
    The $450 worth of Cobra GT tires have been installed.  They look beautiful on the Ranchero's mag rims.  Now if only I can get the $40 of new lug nuts to fit (the old ones are on the truck right now).
Quote
The 1990 Ford Crown Vic, my daily driver, now needs a new heater core, and so, the money goes to that instead of the radiator for the Ranchero.
    My diagnosis of the problem was wrong.  It's not the heater core but rather the intake manifold gasket that was leaking.  It would leak onto the hot block, evaporate, and then send the fumes into the HVAC system.  The whole upper part of the engine has been disassembled in order to replace that gasket, and while everything is apart, the upper and lower radiator hoses have been replaced, a water pump bypass hose has been replaced, the two small hoses leading out of the throttle body are being investigated for replacement, and the PCV valve and its hoses are being checked.

          That gasket and PCV valve/hoses being 25 years old,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 08, 2015, 08:17:33 AM
     Oh, car shows are coming up in my area -- one in April and another in May.  Will my Ranchero be ready to enter one of those show?  Well, I still consider it a "20-footer", i.e., from 20 feet away, it looks fine.  Any nearer than that, then you start seeing the flaws?  :)
     In the latter half of March, I'm considering the spending of more money on it.  It needs new power steering hoses (plus a drain of all the old p.s. fluid), new bushings on the front sway bar links, a new heater valve, a new heater fan switch/resistor pack (right now it is stuck at high speed with no lower speeds), a repaired dome light system, the speedometer cable repaired/replaced, and transmission and differential fluid changes.  For the fluid changes, I'd like to put in synthetic fluid, but that could prove costly for the C6 transmission at $10 a quart.

          That doesn't include a new, costly, heavy-duty radiator,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm
          July 18-19 Commodore Vegas Expo v11 2015 --
          http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 14, 2015, 07:57:36 AM
In the latter half of March, I'm considering the spending of more money on it.
     The next round of repairs has been delayed, because of house property taxes needing to be paid and the final payment for the William Shatner Weekend coming near.
     
          The best-laid plans...
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm
          July 18-19 Commodore Vegas Expo v11 2015 --
          http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: Paul on May 01, 2015, 01:02:09 AM
Cooper Cobra GT's are great tires for the price!

I feel you on the tax thing. I just got hit with a double whammy of property tax and income tax! Yikes!


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on May 01, 2015, 09:36:00 AM
I just got hit with a double whammy of property tax and income tax!
     Ouch!  Fortunately, I'm expecting a tax refund.

          FCUG celebrating 33 years,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm
          July 18-19 Commodore Vegas Expo v11 -
          http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on October 01, 2016, 08:27:36 AM
I filled the tank with premium gasoline (the manual called for 91 octane regular, but now 91 octane means premium) and promised myself not to let the gas level get so low that moisture would build up in the tank again.
    I had not used the Ranchero in a few months, and so, when I came back from my New Zealand-Australia trip, I decided it was time to fire it again.  Gas was down to 1/4 tank, and after warming up the car for awhile, I drove it over to the Chevron station a mile away.  When it got to the gas station's driveway, it stalled out.  Hmm.  I restarted the car and drove it the few feet to the gas pump.  I filled the tank and tried to start the car.  It cranked, but the car wouldn't stop.  Oh-oh.
     I had the car towed to Mooney Shell.  They diagnosed the problem -- clogged fuel filter... clogged with rusty particles from the gas tank.  Not again!  Moisture had gotten into the tank and was wreaking havoc with the metal.  (This doesn't happen with the closed fuel system of the 1988 Mercury Colony Park station wagon, which I let sit for months, too.)  A new filter was installed, and I was advised to use the Ranchero regularly and burn off any contaminated gas.  (I myself will replace the fuel filter after that tank of gas is used up.  The job to replace it isn't too hard.)
     To try and alleviate any moisture in the gas right now, I bought a can of Berryman's B-12 Chemtool.  I'll pour it into the tank tomorrow.  After this tank of gas is used up, I'll buy a bottle of STA-BIL fuel stabilizer and add it when I refuel the tank.  Though expensive, it's supposed to emit fumes that coat the inner metal of the tank, and that coating is supposed to protect the metal from rust.
Quote
There is a leak in one of the lower tubes of the crossflow radiator.
    I have temporarily sealed the leak by pouring in a tube of Alumaseal powder into the cooling system.

          Truly,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on October 24, 2016, 08:10:14 AM
...I was advised to use the Ranchero regularly...
     When I'm in town, I've been using the car every day, running it 5 to 6 miles.  However, what it needs is a long-distance, highway trip to get the engine oil to clean out the engine and for the engine to get hot enough to burn off the carbon.  A trip like that  requires that new radiator and some front suspension work.  I can hardly wait for the day to do that.
     In the meantime, as I drive the Ranchero around town, I notice that knowledgeable men are eyeing the car, even in its dusty condition.  They must know its a semi-classic!

          Truly,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on November 19, 2016, 04:39:48 AM
(I myself will replace the fuel filter after that tank of gas is used up.  The job to replace it isn't too hard.)
     Aw, I changed the filter, and after about 90 miles, the engine is stumbling again... idle too low... stalling out at low speeds... no pep in the acceleration.  Time to change the gas filter again.  :/
     At about $5 a pop plus my labor, it's manageable but tiresome to keep dealing with this contamination problem.  I've been looking at the Perma-Cool fuel filter/water separator 81074 --

http://www.shop.perma-cool.com/Fuel-Filter-Water-Separator-Systems_c21.htm

It uses a spin-on filter for easy replacement and captures any water at the bottom of the filter, the water being easily drained by turning open a petcock.  I just need to know where to plumb it into the gas line of the Ranchero.

          Truly,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on November 21, 2016, 08:30:40 AM
Time to change the gas filter again.
     I changed the filter, but the stumbling/stalling problem remained.  I sprayed carburetor cleaner into the carb throat and into the PCV valve and noticed that the engine ran better as it digested the cleaner.  That told me to get another can of B-12 Chemtool, and even though the gas tank was 1/4 full (5 gallons), I poured in the entire can (15 ounces of Chemtool for 15 gallons is the recommended ratio).  (Ack!  I must remember not to spill it on the car paint, because it can eat that.)
     Though I've read that I should let the Chemtool sit for 45 minutes in the tank, I used the car right away and immediately noticed a better, smoother-running engine with idle speeds back up to normal (which I have set on the high side).  I hope the effects last through the rest of this tank of gas, and when it comes to the next fill-up, I may put in another can of Chemtool.

          Not expensive at $4 a can,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on December 15, 2016, 09:32:40 AM
     The previous owner of the Ranchero had let it deteriorate quite a bit.  It seems that he didn't change the engine oil regularly.  When the carb was rebuilt a little over a hundred miles ago, the mechanics gave the car its first oil change in a long, long time.  When I changed the valve cover gaskets before that oil change, I had found lots of gummy oil under the valve covers and covering the lifters.
     Over a hundred miles later, I checked the oil on the dipstick.  Yow, black, tarry oil globbing on the dipstick, not golden brown oil fluidly sticking on the dipstick!  So, that first oil change had been only the beginning of an eventual flush of the engine.
     I considered buying Motor Flush or other similar flushing chemicals but was scared off that they might be too powerful and exacerbate clogging the oil passages and oil pump.  I decided that regular oil changes and oil filter replacement would eventually flush out the engine.
     So today, with my tools I crawled under the Ranchero and located the oil filter and drain plug.  Both were right there near the driver's side front wheel, in a position which was far easier to get to than the 302 V8 in my Crown Vic and Colony Park.  Off came the no-name oil filter the mechanics had installed; I put in a Fram.  As usual, the mechanics had overtightened the oil pan drain plug, but with me pushing on the socket wrench with my foot, it finally opened up.  Lots of that tar-like oil poured out into the drip pan and some onto the street.  Ack!  What a mess to get that wiped off the street.
     I installed a new, magnetic drain plug (shiny!), after letting the last drop of old oil drip out.  Then I poured in my concoction for a motor flush - 2 quarts of 5W-30 synthetic oil (synthetic with its superior cleaning abilities), 3 quarts of regular oil, and pint of CD2 engine detergent (I prefer Valve Medic, but I can't find that anywhere, anymore.)
     Then I ran the engine at idle, checking for oil leaks.  Afterwards, I drove the car about 4 miles, and when I parked it, I checked for oil leaks again.
     After 100 miles, I'll check on the oil condition again.  If it looks bad, I'll do the same above procedure.  The process will continue until I can be assured that engine has been flushed of all gummy contaminants.  Since the truck is not my daily driver, it will be awhile until I put another 100 miles on it.

          Truly,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on January 21, 2017, 10:24:42 AM
     With all the rain and cold wind here in California, work on the Ranchero has come to a stop.  However, I'm looking forward to April.  There is supposed to be a car show... you know, one of those shows where you come into a lot, park your car, and have spectators look over your vehicle.  If I wash truck, spray protectant on the tires, clean the glass inside and out (getting rid of water spots), shine up the chrome with Turtle Wax chrome polish, polish the aluminum wheels with Mother's Paste, replace the broken wheel center caps with new spinner center caps (probably from SummitRacing.com), and install new mag wheel washers and wheel nuts, then the Ranchero would look acceptable.  Hey, I should give the engine a degreasing, too.
     To do the wheel/tire combos correctly, I would have to remove one at a time, do the laborious polishing, and apply the protectant.

          Back from the Caribbean,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on February 22, 2017, 06:03:58 AM
...it needs is a long-distance, highway trip to get the engine oil to clean out the engine and for the engine to get hot enough to burn off the carbon.  A trip like that requires that new radiator and some front suspension work.
  The long-distance tripping has to be moved farther into the future.  Not only does the Ranchero need a new radiator but I think it also needs rear suspension parts.  At low speeds I knew that the rear end would shift over when it would hit a bump (the rear end should track straight and follow the front suspension).  The other day I was driving the car around, and I decided to accelerate it down one freeway entrance and back up the next freeway exit - a distance of a mile.  I stepped on the accelerator and felt the carburetor open up.  So far, so good.  However, when I corrected the steering to straighten out the car after entering the freeway, I felt the rear end shift over again, unsettinglingly so.
     The four-link rear end is not stable.  From what I can see, the bushings have dried and cracked on the upper and lower control arms.  Instead of replacing the bushings, I say that the better solution is to replace the control arms with a modern solution - new, engineered arms from Spohn.  See

http://www.spohn.net/shop/1972-1976-Ford-Torino-Ranchero/Suspension/

An expensive solution but one that replaces Ford's more primitive, 1970's solution.

          Truly,
          Robert Bernardo
          June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW -
          http://www.portcommodore.com/pacommex
          July 29-30 Commodore Vegas Expo v13 -
          http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on February 26, 2017, 06:12:07 AM
The four-link rear end is not stable.  From what I can see, the bushings have dried and cracked on the upper and lower A-arms.
     Confirmed by my mechanics.  The upper A-arm bushings are in worse shape than the lower A-arm bushings.  But when I decide to have them replaced, all of them will be replaced at once.

          Not one set at a time,
          Robert Bernardo
          June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW -
          http://www.portcommodore.com/pacommex
          July 29-30 Commodore Vegas Expo v13 -
          http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on March 29, 2017, 10:23:52 AM
     Last Sunday while I was traveling through Washington state, I stopped to pick up an item I had bought on eBay.  The item was some chromed aluminum mouldings for the rear window of my Ford Ranchero.  The seller could not send the mouldings through the mail, only for local pick up.  So, I went far into the forested mountains of Washington, past the pine and fir trees, past the isolated river in the middle of nowhere.  I finally arrived at his warehouse... yes, a warehouse in the middle of a clearing in the forest.
     In the clearing, there was at least a half dozen Ford Torinos and Rancheros in various broken-down states of condition, slowly rusting in the light rain.  James came out to greet me and handed me the mouldings.  Then he asked if I wanted to see the inside of his warehouse.  I said yes.  Oh, my gosh!  There were another dozen Torinos, Gran Torinos, and Rancheros inside!  Most were being stripped for parts, though a few of the rough ones could be restored (with a lot of money!).  There were parts all over the place!  Motors
in one area, rear differentials in another area, doors in another, car glass in another, etc., etc..  If only my camera had been charged up so I could have taken photos!  I told James that I had heard stories about hidden warehouses full of old cars, and now I was
standing in one!
     We talked for about an hour... about cars, about my retirement, about my old computers.  It was all very enjoyable.  Eventually, the rain outside started to get worse, and James had to get back to work disassembling cars or sorting the parts.  I asked him to look for a coolant recovery tank for my 1972 Ford Ranchero, and he was sure that he would be able to find it.  I said that I would be back in his area in June.  Perhaps I can visit his warehouse again!

          It was Ford Torino/Gran Torino/Ranchero heaven!
          Robert Bernardo
          June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW -
          http://www.portcommodore.com/pacommex
          July 29-30 Commodore Vegas Expo v13 -
          http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on April 07, 2017, 07:09:30 AM
     While I wait to order the pricey items for the Ranchero, I'm doing small things to keep it running well.  The ignition points are fair (not yet time to replace it with electronic ignition), but I did replace the distributor cap and rotor, just in case.  The cap was replaced with one that had brass contacts, and the rotor was replaced with another brass contact one (the original had some corrosion).  I sprayed a can of SeaFoam through the carburetor.  Whew, what a lot of noxious vapor came out of the exhaust as that SeaFoam combusted!  I then ran the car on the freeway for a few miles.  According to the Ranchero's tach, I picked up another 50 rpm with the transmission in drive and 150 rpm in park.  A nice, little gain!  Time to adjust the carburetor to compensate for the extra revs.
     After the 15th of the month, I'll order some low-resistance Taylor spark plug cables and a Spectre washable air filter from SummitRacing.com

         Thinking about ordering one item more from SummitRacing,
         Robert Bernardo
         June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW -
         http://www.portcommodore.com/pacommex
         July 29-30 Commodore Vegas Expo v13 -
         http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on May 01, 2017, 09:28:29 AM
...I'm looking forward to April.  There is supposed to be a car show... you know, one of those shows where you come into a lot, park your car, and have spectators look over your vehicle.
     The car show is on May 20.  Unfortunately, I will be going to the Bay Area Maker Faire that weekend.

           My Ranchero not at that car show,
           Robert Bernardo
           June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW -
           http://www.portcommodore.com/pacommex
           July 29-30 Commodore Vegas Expo v13 -
           http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on May 16, 2017, 09:41:07 AM
     While at Valley Differentials for diff repair on my father's 1979 Chevy C30, I asked Miles, the shop owner/mechanic about upgrading the diff in my Ranchero.  I explained that it was ordinary, open, 9-inch diff, and I wanted the upgrade to a Trac-Lok (limited slip) diff.  He quoted me a price of $625.  Wow, far cheaper than what I had thought!
     I told him that in late 2017 or early 2018, I could bring the car in for the upgrade.

          Well, that's the plan,
          Robert Bernardo
          June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW -
          http://www.portcommodore.com/pacommex
          July 29-30 Commodore Vegas Expo v13 -
          http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on December 02, 2017, 05:47:01 AM
     A little bit of progress on the Ford Ranchero... I've ordered a new ignition lock cylinder/door lock cylinder set from Dearborn Classics and and a pair of new, plastic "window rollers" from Auto Krafters.  Those will be installed in mid-December.  Then I will have smooth locking in the ignition and doors, and the windows will be rolling smoothly up and down.

          Merry Christmas!
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group
          http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm


Title: Re: 1972 Ford Ranchero!
Post by: RobertB on September 14, 2018, 02:16:07 AM
     OMG!  I spent over 7 hours spread over 2 days in order to shine up a brass license plate frame on the rear of the Ranchero!  I now feel how it was for my automotive ancestors who had to shine up the brass on their antique cars of the 1900's to the 1930's!
     The license plate and its frame had received no care from me or from the car's former owner in years.  I decided that I should disassemble everything and give everything a good cleaning before reattaching and putting on the new registration sticker.  Removing the assembly from the rear bumper was relatively easy.  I separated the frame, plate, and bolts/nuts and washed everything.  Then I tried metal polish on the thick brass frame.  After a lot of rubbing and a couple of hours, I had only progress a little bit.  Hmm, there had to be a faster way to do this!  I had no buffer/polishing wheel, but I had Tarn-X tarnish remover.  I remembered that when I was little I used it to shine up a copper penny, and lately as an adult, I had used it to shine up some door hardware.  Though the bottle specifically said not to use it with brass, I tried it anyway.  With a cotton swab, I applied the Tarn-X liquid to the front surface of the frame.  The rotten egg smell that it gave off as it contacted the tarnish meant that it was working.  The bottle said not to leave it on for more than 2 minutes, and afterwards to rinse it off with water.  Done.  Hmm, slight effect.  Time for several applications.  Over and over, I followed the same process, except with each time, I left it in contact for longer and longer periods of time.
     Finally, after 2 hours of this, I rinsed it off, dried the frame, and tried the metal polish.  The Tarn-X had dissolved some tarnish and weakened the leftover tarnish, making it easier to remove the tarnish with the polish.  What a trick!  I hand-buffed the brass frame to a high luster and then turned my attention to the license plate.  I removed the old registration stickers by slitting them with an X-Acto knife and pulling off the pieces.  I then weakened the glue residue on the plate by using paint thinner and then rubbing off the residue.  I washed the plate again and gave it coat of car wax before affixing the new registration sticker.  For the bolts, nuts, and washers, I immersed them in Tarn-X.  After 1/2 hour, I rinsed them, let them dry, and then steel-wooled the top of the bolts.  They were a dull black which would not match the brass frame.  To make them match, I painted the top of the bolts with some gold leaf paint I had for another project.  Then I let the bolts dry.
     I reassembled everything back on Ranchero.  Wow, a bit of bling on the old car!

          Truly,
          Robert Bernardo
          Fresno Commodore User Group - http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm
          Southern California Commodore & Amiga Network - http://www.portcommodore.com/sccan